Author Topic: Furries post-contact  (Read 1713 times)

Offline Eboreg

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Furries post-contact
« on: October 06, 2014, 08:13:06 pm »
I've been thinking about this rather interesting repercussion from the Cyantians starting public contact with Earth. Remember Mako, the human who went in for a clinical trial to cure his cancer and ended up getting his genome messed up and becoming some sort of shark-man? Thing is, if past is precedent in terms of technological progress, then someone, somewhere will figure out how to duplicate this result and probably even do it with separate genes. After that, this kind of thing will be mass-marketed. My question is, how long until the furry community starts taking advantage of this?
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Offline Gifted

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Re: Furries post-contact
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2014, 09:44:08 pm »
Most of the furries I know are fairly well grounded in reality, and while there would be plenty of curiosity, just being able to become furry would not be enough to make them go for it.  The ones that go would be way out in left field.  There would be a fair amount of tourism, and the hospital would need extra beds for those like Marcus.
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Offline Eboreg

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Re: Furries post-contact
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2014, 09:48:21 am »
Still, one would think that with the Cyantians running around in public by that time, it might be a bit more socially acceptable.
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Offline hariman

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Re: Furries post-contact
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2014, 03:54:02 pm »
And suddenly I'm reminded of that plot of an episode of Batman Beyond where teenagers are getting "Spliced" with animal dna to rebel against their parents.

Only, you know, without the "take over the world" plot.

And less common. And probably not an issue worth considering too much.
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Offline Lillowen

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Re: Furries post-contact
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2014, 07:23:36 am »
Three things will weigh in on such an issue: cost of treatment, time to change, and availability of treatment.  Also, the ability to be reverted likely will play some role.  As to the furry community, most of the various individuals I've met who are unstable enough, personality- and identity-wise to do so are also the least financially solvent, oft-times living paycheck to paycheck (when they collect such a thing at all).  While I predict some minor market penetration in the furry subculture, I sincerely doubt it will become terribly common.  As well, the same can be said, market-wise, for its' penetration amongst the mainstream rank and file, for the opposite reason: when looked at socially, the furry fandom is generally reviled, or at best thought of as an unpleasant and sexual kink.  This also would preclude market penetration.  Were this to somehow be reasonably priced, highly available, and allow for reasonably swift (3 - 5 day) changes (likely accompanied with being laid abed the time), there would have to be a nigh-overwhelming media campaign to make this kind of thing socially acceptable (and this includes undoing decades of ill-repute and self-imposed bad reputation on the part of the furry fandom).  The media campaign alone would cause its' own backlash likely in the fandom, and be opposed by the sad realities of it.

If, somehow, these were all met, you MIGHT get a reasonable market penetration, but I doubt the financial returns would make it a viable product.

On top of all of this there is the issue of maintaining identity across multiple sections of the legal system that provide and require photo-based and biometric-based IDs.  The additional fees and bureaucracy might also make it prohibitive.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2014, 10:47:24 am by Lillowen »
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